How long do Macbook last

It’s no question that MacBooks are incredible machines. However, just like any other machine, time also takes a toll on them. Regardless of how much you love your MacBook, it’s just a matter of time before you have to replace it.

Apple builds all their devices to last for a good long time. There are folks still waiting for the release of the iPhone 12, so they can upgrade from their iPhone 5s to the iPhone 6. Although that’s beyond the point of this post, it goes to show just how long Apple products can last.

“How long do MacBooks last” has no fixed answer because a lot of factors determine your MacBook’s lifespan? For instance, your MacBook will last longer if you take good care of it. There’s also speculation that older models were built to last longer than the newer ones, but the proof is in the pudding.

In this piece, we’ll look at telltale signs that it’s time to replace your MacBook. That way, you can start saving for a new one before your current one dies abruptly.

How Long Do MacBooks Last?

There’s no clear cut answer to how long a MacBook actually lasts. That’s because there are tons of factors that will determine your MacBook’s lifespan.

Your MacBook won’t last for too long if you use it for intensive stuff like gaming or CAD. You also shouldn’t expect a long life span from a MacBook that you are constantly exposing to dust or extreme temperatures.

While there’s no exact time frame for how long a MacBook lasts, the ballpark life span of a MacBook is about seven years. Before you celebrate, you should first check if your MacBook shows any signs of wear and aging.

Telltale Signs That It’s Time to Replace Your MacBook

Even a thousand-dollar laptop isn’t immune to the implications of time. As much you may hate upgrading such an expensive laptop, you just have to do it. Next time, you’ll be more careful with your MacBook or your laptop choices.

Here are signs that you need to get another MacBook:-

There’s Not Enough Space for Anything

Not in all cases, but generally, when you find that you’re running out of space, then you need a new MacBook. The more you use your laptop, the more apps and files you’ll have on it. Also, as developers keep churning out better apps, you’ll find that apps these days, take up more space than they used to.

It’s worse for gamers because games could take up as much as 100 GB of space. If you can’t get a new machine, it means you constantly have to free up space for new items. Sometimes, you have no option but to delete the apps you really like for more important stuff.

However, there are smart ways you can free up disk space without sacrificing your precious apps and files. However, if you find that you have to juggle between apps, then it’s best just to get yourself a new MacBook.

Lots of Software Issues

Even a month old MacBook could have software issues, but the problem is when they start getting out of hand. Some of these software issues include frequent glitches, abrupt freezing, or when the computer switches off spontaneously.

Some of these issues may stem from not having enough space, which is another reason to replace your Mac. If space is not the issue, then it probably has something to do with the MacBook’s internal components.

Try a PRAM reset and see if it fixes the problem. If it fixes the problem or not, you should still consider getting a new Mac.

You Have Weak Components

Your MacBook must have been a beast of a machine the first time you bought it, but now it’s more of a beast of burden. With time, certain components of your Mac take a hit from being in operation for so long.

Your RAM is usually the first component that declines with time. If it does so, you’ll notice that your computer runs much slower than it used to run. After some time, stuff like editing 4K videos or playing video games becomes impossible with your Mac.

The MacBook’s rechargeable battery also only has a couple of charging cycles and thus also deteriorates with time. When it does, you’ll find that the MacBook takes longer to get to full charge. At some point, the laptop may stop charging completely.

You Can’t Update Your Mac’s OS

Apple churns out new software for the Mac yearly, and it works on all recent MacBook models. Mac computers from the last couple of years should be able to run it smoothly. So if you find that your Mac isn’t compatible with the latest macOS, then you definitely need an upgrade.

Though you hate to hear it, if your MacBook can’t run the latest macOS, then it’s becoming obsolete. Not only will you miss out on the latest features on macOS, but you’ll also be more vulnerable to attacks. You best get yourself a more recent MacBook model to avoid all this.

Remember, you won’t have to pay the entire retail price if you trade-in your old MacBook. So carry your old MacBook with you to the Apple store and see if it’s eligible for trade-in. That way, you can snag yourself a newer model for less.

When It’s Physically Damaged

Over time, your MacBook is bound to take a beating during its use. Everything from dropping to the screen cracking or spilling coffee on your Mac.

Most people would rush to the nearest computer repair shop to get it fixed. It seems logical, but it’s not the best move to take. It makes no sense spending hundreds of dollars for repairs on an obsolete machine.

The best thing to do is to save up enough money for a newer model for the MacBook.

Upgrade Your MacBook for a Better Experience

You shouldn’t get a newer version of a MacBook just because you have to. There’s much more a MacBook upgrade delivers for your daily laptop use. Plus, with the trade-in option, you don’t have to shell out a lot of cash for a new MacBook.

“How long do MacBooks last?” is a question that shouldn’t worry you too much. All you have to do is check for the above signs, and you’ll know that your MacBook has outlived its lifespan.

Be sure to check out other pieces on the site for more informative reads.

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